Clubbing for College

The activities that will impress colleges.

From+left+to+right%3A+Health+Occupations+Student+Association%2C+National+Honor+Society+and+Key+Club.
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Clubbing for College

From left to right: Health Occupations Student Association, National Honor Society and Key Club.

From left to right: Health Occupations Student Association, National Honor Society and Key Club.

From left to right: Health Occupations Student Association, National Honor Society and Key Club.

From left to right: Health Occupations Student Association, National Honor Society and Key Club.

Jasmine Tran, Katie Welsh, and Jazmin Devore

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College is a stressful concept to think about when considering classes and extracurriculars. Many students worry about acceptance and filling out application forms. What can they do to help them get accepted? Is there any way that they can increase their chance of getting into their dream college early on? One way to enrich your application in high school is by joining the clubs offered. Here at Tahoma High School, we offer many clubs that would make your application pop. Of these clubs, there were threatening and the e main ones that would be the most beneficial; National Honors Society (NHS), Key Club, and Health Occupations Students of America (HOSA).

Lara Lindersmith, the Future Ready Coordinator at THS, helped us get some insight as to what colleges look for in a student. According to her, colleges seek students that display extra dedication to an activity.  She offered a few questions to help students better inform both themselves and colleges on what skills they possess and how much they care about the subject. These include: “Have [I] spent time doing extra things besides the minimum that’s required?” and “Have [I] had a leadership position in [this] activity?” The activity that you choose to participate in is almost completely free range, which could potentially be overwhelming for some people. Having the opportunity to narrow down options could be extremely beneficial to those looking to enrich their character, but don’t exactly know what career path they would like to take. Pressure to partake in the ‘right’ activity could be greatly minimized by joining school clubs. Colleges don’t look for your contribution in any specific clubs, but they do look for dedication to your choice. Tahoma is very helpful in that aspect, because they offer many clubs that are both interesting and engaging for the students, as well as those that are attractive on college applications.

One thing that colleges look for especially, is a commitment to community service by the applicant which can be difficult for students to achieve on their own. There are, however, opportunities here at Tahoma that can make community service more approachable. One club offered here that can help with this is NHS, which is advised by Jonathan Neil. “One thing that colleges look for that … [are] students that are doing more than just their academics. They’re looking for students that are reaching and and trying to help their community, and be community leaders, and that’s exactly what we do — we reach out and help people and establish leaders,” Neil explains. For a college looking at potential applicants, having this as an experience speaks volumes for your personal character. You are more of a considerable option if you have something like this on your application.

Another club that can help enhance your character is Key Club, advised by Anne Hobson, which is centered around community service. Hobson explains how Key Club offers a variety of community service opportunities. This includes: working in the community garden, volunteering at the Maple Valley Community Center, and assisting at Vine Maple Place. If you commit to a sense of community, you are making yourself a more well-rounded applicant, which makes you stand out to those reading your application.

Another thing that colleges heavily emphasize is following your passions and interests. While Tahoma may not have a club for everyone, a very popular and favorable occupation amongst Tahoma students is categorized within the medical field. Future Health Professionals / Health Occupation Students of America (HOSA), is a club that can help you attain this occupation. According to Kelly Jarvis, HOSA gives students the opportunity to, “talk to people who are actually in the field that they might be interested in, and then opening up ideas of what’s out there, because it’s not just nurse, doctor.” Having experience with professionals in the field you are interested in is very important in giving you a headstart to knowing how things work in that specific workplace. Having background knowledge and experience is a major plus in the eyes of college officials.

A big part of your college application is a description of experiences and credentials that you possess. A sense of dedication in high school says a lot about character, both as a person and as a student. Participating in clubs in high school is a very effective way to enrich your character and boost your image in the eyes of colleges.